PDA

View Full Version : Remarkable colour image of Mars


Seven
01-06-2004, 05:41 PM
Nasa's Mars lander has just beamed back some truely remarkable high res colour images of Mars.

This is the first released. Apparently better images are to follow.

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040106a/PIA04995.jpg

WOW.. just WOW

Sevv

[TOY]Snoop
01-06-2004, 05:55 PM
This really rocks!
Imagine standing there yourself and taking a photo like this one :surprised

Greets

Breinmeester
01-06-2004, 06:13 PM
WoW! It's so cool to see that it's actually out there. Looks like you could walk around there.

Riddick
01-06-2004, 06:44 PM
Woooooaw!Fantastic job, a really good texture!!!

Uh wha..What? It is Mars, the reel planet and It's an amazing landscape!
Really a hot pic!:applause:

Dennik
01-06-2004, 07:03 PM
Well, i believe we'll live to see ourselves up there one day.
The way the technology advances, maybe by the time we are 60-70, a trip to Mars will be just a routine.
:)

Pixelmaestro
01-06-2004, 07:05 PM
First structure on Mars will be a Resort Casino

mattregnier
01-06-2004, 07:41 PM
Originally posted by Dennik
Well, i believe we'll live to see ourselves up there one day.
The way the technology advances, maybe by the time we are 60-70, a trip to Mars will be just a routine.
:)

a nice thought but highly doubtful. I'm sure people said that back in the 60's when we landed on the moon :) that was almost 40 yrs ago and we still haven't sent any physical humans to there and back yet

Titus
01-06-2004, 07:47 PM
I find something strange in the image, I just can't figure what.


http://garagepost.tv/imagenes/marsFake.jpg
:)

quid
01-06-2004, 07:58 PM
I read that they keep on adding to that image and that in a week it will be a full 360. The most intereting lookin rocks look like they are almost underneith the rover (at the bottom of the image).

craiggulow
01-06-2004, 08:24 PM
Originally posted by mattregnier
a nice thought but highly doubtful. I'm sure people said that back in the 60's when we landed on the moon :) that was almost 40 yrs ago and we still haven't sent any physical humans to there and back yet

Uh... the 1969 Moon landing had two people walking around on the Moon and they are both back here on Earth. The Apollo program continued during the early 1970's with several other astronauts landing on the moon and returning to Earth.
But I'm just kicking at what you wrote, I'm sure you meant that we're not there in "force" with moonbases and routine flights and all that.

betelgeuse
01-06-2004, 08:33 PM
Originally posted by mattregnier
a nice thought but highly doubtful. I'm sure people said that back in the 60's when we landed on the moon :) that was almost 40 yrs ago and we still haven't sent any physical humans to there and back yet

I think Matt's right. These current robotic missions, while expensive, are nothing compared to the cost of sending humans to Mars. I just don't see any country(s) justifying sending humans to mars in view of the expense required to do so.

I wish we could have attached a video cam to the rover to get a live feed from Mars, though (minus the 9 minutes or so for the transmission to reach earth). I realize there's not much motion activity going on, but it could run while the rover is moving. Guess they'd have to have some way to boost the feeble signal coming from that great a distance. Oh well.

Dennik
01-06-2004, 09:55 PM
I'm basing my prediction in the hope of a discovery that will bring things upside down in the propulsion technology. Something that will reduce the costs hundrents of times, and make such journeys affordable. I remember reading an article few years ago, about NASA experimenting with all kinds of crazy approaches to the matter, like using light beams to elevate small rocket models. I don't know what the progress is in this endeavor, but it would be very interesting to find out. This jet propulsion technology is getting ancient, so something new has to be invented some time soon.

erilaz
01-06-2004, 10:11 PM
I know it's just a barren terrain with rocky bits, but I always get a really bizarre feeling when I look at something like this. That "I'm on another freakin' planet" kinda feeling.

PhilOsirus
01-06-2004, 10:43 PM
Too bad the link is down. I thought the sky on Mars was blue, only the dust/earth was red. Or is it because of dust storms? If it is it sure is dusty over there.

Pin_pal
01-06-2004, 11:29 PM
Wow. Looks just like the last time we were there.

peachstapler
01-07-2004, 04:04 AM
Originally posted by Phil "Osirus"
Too bad the link is down. I thought the sky on Mars was blue, only the dust/earth was red. Or is it because of dust storms? If it is it sure is dusty over there.

The sky on Earth appears blue because of the water vapor and other elements in the atmosphere. Mars' atmosphere has very little water vapor pressence (I think it's a fraction of a percentage). It would be nice to get greenhouse gas producing factories on Mars to commence a terraforming operation, pumping out all the bad stuff that we're trying to save our atmosphere from enduring. Greenhouse gases would rise, and eventually trap the Sun's energy under the Martian atmosphere (it's very thin) and would cause global warming at a rate of a few degrees per year, in turn causing global flooding from melting polar ice caps and from there ... evaporation, water vapor, life sustaining atmosphere, etc.

froggyplat
01-07-2004, 05:49 AM
luckily, all that can be done in the matter of a few seconds....if you're "ahnold".

i've got a mars desktop now...so cool:cool:

thethule
01-07-2004, 09:31 AM
Actually i think the pictures of the 1998 pathfinder missions were much better (if not as big). They were so clear and crisp and bright.
But i do totally agree with you Erilaz, you look at these pictures and think "weird, that's somewhere i can't possible get to, that's another planet" You really get an amazing feeling of isolation looking at it. As for men getting to mars within our lifetime. Highly unlikely. Far too expensive at the moment as well as countless other problems. Plus, im not embarrassed to say that I'm one of those who believe the lunar landings were faked. :) It's a real shame that the Beagle2 craft was lost. It would have been great for the UK and for bringing a certain other country's smugness down a notch.


On another note: If Mdme Sadie is reading this... Hello Per, its your old London workmate Marc here!

paintbox
01-07-2004, 11:40 AM
Amazing. I completely agree with Erilaz' comment. It reminds you how Big the universe really is, and then to think Mars is 'just' a neighbouring planet.

It also gives you a sense of "hey you could actually walk around there" (prolly waiting for the first resort I guess hehe)

*EDIT* anyone else noticed how black the rocks are ?

betelgeuse
01-07-2004, 12:21 PM
I don't think the absence of water vapor prevents Mars' sky from being blue. Earth's sky is blue due to Rayleigh scattering (http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/atmos/blusky.html) of light from the gas molecules of the atmosphere itself. It's been said that, if you could cleanse the Martian atmosphere of dust, it would also be blue. >>Link (http://calspace.ucsd.edu/marsnow/library/science/climate_history/sky_color1.html)<<

paintbox
01-07-2004, 02:58 PM
Does anyone know what the transmission speed of the data is ? (from surface to earth)

If it was high enough you could prolly send video...

[TOY]Snoop
01-07-2004, 03:05 PM
Originally posted by paintbox
Does anyone know what the transmission speed of the data is ? (from surface to earth)

If it was high enough you could prolly send video...

Or they should have installed a webcam :) haha

mv
01-07-2004, 03:19 PM
Originally posted by erilaz
I know it's just a barren terrain with rocky bits, but I always get a really bizarre feeling when I look at something like this. That "I'm on another freakin' planet" kinda feeling.

ah too true . And it looks so close to a landscape that could be on earth...And when you think of what's happening on there. Rocks rolling, wind, sand. Over and over again for millions of years. Just that. Rocks, wind, sand. :surprised
. earth is heaven .

About sending men on mars in this century... i guess it will only happen if another kind of "cold war" happens ..(between china and the states?) (but I doubt it would) because it' just a pride thing, totally unnecessary. Robots do the job better.

mv
01-07-2004, 03:29 PM
also what I'm waiting for is nice shots of martian volcanoes and of its great canyon.. for now all we have from mars are those boring rocky plains...

Balusilustalu
01-07-2004, 03:58 PM
Makes me want to go and read the Kim Stanley Robinson trilogy again. :)

As for Mars being red... the way I understood it was because of the high quantity of iron oxide present in the rock and sand.

betelgeuse
01-07-2004, 04:02 PM
also what I'm waiting for is nice shots of martian volcanoes and of its great canyon.. for now all we have from mars are those boring rocky plains...

That would be awesome wouldn't it! Unfortunately you'll be waiting for quite some time since the type of landings they do these days (bouncing and rolling to a stop in inflatable air bags) would make these areas unbelievably hazardous to the mission. However, you can check out these features by going to the Mars Global surveyor web site.

You know what they need? A small radio controlled helibot (helicopter) with a camera if the atmosphere is thick enough to support it. Yeah, I know there's a nine minute delay for transmission signals, but you don't have the hazards in the air that you do on the ground. On-board software would allow it to land without human guidance. They'd be able to identify interesting spots for the rovers to check out very quickly.

Dennik
01-07-2004, 04:28 PM
Although the conversation has taken another turn, i'm returning to answer some nonbelievers about what technology could bring us in the near decades, making trips to space very affordable.
Check this link about the current progress on light propulsion technology (http://science.howstuffworks.com/light-propulsion.htm)

betelgeuse
01-07-2004, 04:59 PM
Originally posted by Dennik
Although the conversation has taken another turn, i'm returning to answer some nonbelievers about what technology could bring us in the near decades, making trips to space very affordable.
Check this link about the current progress on light propulsion technology (http://science.howstuffworks.com/light-propulsion.htm)

I don't think anyone is doubting that there are viable alternative technologies being developed for spacecraft propulsion. It's just that in the near future, the costs involved for manned space flight will still be overwhelmingly more expensive than robotic missions regardless of the delivery vehicle. The life support costs for the whole trip will be a huge additional expense that is obviously not required for robotic missions. Just think, if an incredibly reliable and cheap propulsion technology is available, you could send perhaps weekly or monthly probes to planets rather 4 or 5 per decade.

mv
01-07-2004, 06:34 PM
yeah, exactly. For now , there is nothing to do for human beings on mars. Just pride and vanity.

cyphyr
01-07-2004, 07:35 PM
Why cant NASA ever get its photostitching act together?

pomru
01-07-2004, 07:37 PM
Originally posted by paintbox
Does anyone know what the transmission speed of the data is ? (from surface to earth)

If it was high enough you could prolly send video...
According to NASA's Mars Rover site (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/comm_data.html), the direct-to-earth transmission speed varies between 3.5 kb/s and 12 kb/s. The rover also communicates with the orbiter, 60 megabits (yes, megabits) during each time the orbiter passes over the rover. I'm guessing that's not enough bandwidth for a webcam on Mars unless you don't mind postage stamp-sized images. ;)

igorstshirts
01-07-2004, 08:20 PM
I wanna see pictures of Mons and the Mariner canyon... Where are those?:bounce:

Dennik
01-07-2004, 08:28 PM
It must be very difficult to move this rover with no realtime feedback. All movements must be planed carefully to give a precise sequence of commands. Thats another reason why humans should do such missions. The research done could be 10 times more.

mv
01-07-2004, 08:44 PM
@dennik : :surprised and what about ai, and all researches done about environmental and spatial recognition?

betelgeuse
01-07-2004, 08:56 PM
Yeah, I don't think controlling the rovers is all that difficult compared, for example, with keeping one or more humans alive for a round trip to Mars.

They must include my patented idea for the helibot, however:)

Dennik
01-07-2004, 08:57 PM
There is no A.I yet from what i know. And i personaly wouldn't trust such an expensive mission, to some clever programming alone. Do you know how many programmers work for NASA? How many levels of debugging do these programs go through? No.. in such missions the human guidance is still needed for the bigest part.

mv
01-07-2004, 09:12 PM
Well, when I say "AI" I don't mean almost-human robots lol. I bet AIBO could almost avoid the rocks in the martian plains. That's what I'm speaking of. Avoiding rocks, climbing, taking rest when batteries have to be recharged, sending signals. Could be remote controlled from the earth, but vaguely, in a way that doesn't need realtime ("go to that rock in the south" : the rover analyses its environment, finds the better way by itself, etc..).

And the expensive missions are already trusting a clever programming, about the entering in atmosphere, the landing etc..

PhilOsirus
01-07-2004, 09:18 PM
The sky on Earth appears blue because of the water vapor and other elements in the atmosphere.

I doubt that myself, I mean water isn't blue at all, it just looks blue because it reflects the blue sky. I suppose it's true if you could remove the dust you'd see a blue sky. I remember seeing Mars pictures (of the whole planet) where you could see a partial blue atmosphere.

Also I don't get this: What is so difficult about sending a monstertruck-toy-like machine up there? Those things can roll over anything, they won't get stuck in some puddle. I mean put all the fancy equipement on one machine, and a simple camera on a remote controlled monster truck;)

Edit: Ah here (http://www.why-is-the-sky-blue.org/why-is-the-sky-blue.html) is an explanation. It was a both of both of your answers. So basicly, the sky on Mars must be blue, even if the atmosphere must be very thin, or else it has no sky at all, in which case it would be space-black. No reason for it to be red other than the dust. Imagine a picture of Mars with no dust in the air!

K Dawg
01-07-2004, 09:31 PM
Well Phil simply put, if ya put a monstertruck up there with a cam, you need more energy and on mars there ainīt no Gas station or anyone who could fill it up.
A lil solar robot is the best cause it donīt need that much energy and donīt need any gas to fill up.


And your therory about the water is wrong. sure water itself ainīt blue, water just breaks the ultraviolet rays in its RGB colors and absorbs the Blue and the sky reflects the Blue color of the water then. Simply put, if earth would not have any water, who knows how the sky would look.
Mars has no water and the atmosphere is with iron oxidation stuff. donīt know the exact word. That is why it is red.

Now i know not everyone trusts nasa, i donīt either 100% but those guys do know alot of stuff. and most of it is ti believe. ;)

mv
01-07-2004, 10:20 PM
here are links on the very subject of quasi autonomous robots...

JPL AI group (http://www-aig.jpl.nasa.gov/)
"autonomous rovers for mars exploration" - article (http://ic.arc.nasa.gov/projects/ai-rovers/papers/IEEE-aero99.pdf)
http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m2483/n3_v19/21210019/p1/article.jhtml

blade of bunny
01-07-2004, 11:25 PM
mars apears red due the the oxidized iron elements in the soil,dust,ext.

betelgeuse
01-07-2004, 11:55 PM
Not to take anything away from these exciting Mars missions, but there are other missions going on as well.

1. Stardust: Nasa's comet sample return mission (http://stardust.jpl.nasa.gov/)
It's already flown within 149 miles of a comet to collect particles being thrown off. It will actually return them to earth.

2.Cassini (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/index.cfm)
After a seven-year voyage that includes four gravity-assist maneuvers, Cassini will enter Saturn's orbit in July of 2004. It will then begin a four-year mission that includes more than 70 orbits around the ringed planet and its moons. Pointing its various instruments at carefully calculated scientific targets, Cassini will collect detailed data on Saturn, its rings and the 30 known moons orbiting this gas giant. ...
In December 2004, Cassini will eject the Huygens probe. After its 22-day coast, the cone-shaped probe will descend into Titan's cloudy atmosphere. Three sets of parachutes will deploy to slow the probe and to provide a stable platform for scientific measurements. Instruments on board will collect information about the atmosphere's chemical composition and the clouds surrounding Titan. The data will be radioed to the Cassini orbiter, which will then relay the data to Earth.

About two hours after entering Titan's atmosphere, the probe will land near the moon's equator. If Huygens survives the impact, the probe might be able to communicate with the spacecraft for a few minutes after landing on the frozen surface of Titan. Huygens will be the furthest human-made object ever to land on a celestial body.

Cool stuff, huh?

paintbox
01-08-2004, 12:15 PM
Originally posted by betelgeuse

Cool stuff, huh?

Absolutely. In a way these really are new frontiers we are exploring. And then to think we aint even left the solar system !

About the transmission speed, I think the speed is adequate, but there simply isn't a continues stream, just a couple of minutes to relay date everytime the satelite passes over. Unless it is in geostationary orbit ofcourse...

PiledotNET
01-08-2004, 12:28 PM
I was observing, isn't there any flying dust caused by the landing of the machine.

I don't know if this is a valid thing for now, but right after the landing a lot of dust comes to air (I think).

Would be nice to shot something like this to know exacly to were the wind is going, or if there's wind.

Phrenzy84
01-08-2004, 12:42 PM
lookin at these pictures makes me think of movies like Total Recall and Aliens. I think that one day people, will live there, dont know if it will be in my lifetime, (19 at the moment). But i think humans will live over there. Makes you wonder how will they set something like that up, will they try to make the air beatheable or will they make a city beneath glass.

Still a long way to go though, with all the info they gather on this mission, the next one.... first human on Mars, will be the biggest achievement of the 21st century. I bet the guys at NASA are already trying to think of a good phase when the first step is taken :).

Stuff like this really gets my blood going, thats a different planet, not a set and something that has been created by somone. Woah .

quid
01-08-2004, 01:14 PM
What they should really do to grab the public's attention would be for NASA to send like 50 QRIOs (http://www.sony.net/SonyInfo/QRIO/) from Sony there all equipped with little camcorders and little rock picks. When they land they can get out and do a synchronized dance. That would be so much cooler than the clunky rovers NASA has been sending there. But seriously the AI in those things could be reworked for real science and their power supplies could be swapped out and replaced with mini radioisotope generators (they can’t get away with that here on earth) and they could run for a long, long time or they can use solar power too. They could also have them all networked together so if one finds something good all 50 could come running to check it out and take it apart with their little pick axes… one could stand back with his camcorder filming it all. The possibilities are endless. Sending robots that are bipeds has some advantages too; aside from being cute and able to hold a camcorder in one hand and a pick in the other while walking in a funky manner, they could repel down cliffs climb mountains and rock faces (the QRIO would need some improvements for this, but not much) and if the public looses interest, as they did with the Apollo missions, the little QRIOs could all drop their tools and break down into a funky dance and start singing and stuff.

Dennik
01-08-2004, 02:37 PM
Heh, and then the little Qrios decide to declare Mars as their own ground. They put a flag and name it "Planet Qrion". Their A.I evolves, they start reproducing themselves, populating the whole planet, and build defences to protect it from any future human intervention. Nobody ever finds out how the first Qrios on Mars realised their existance, and took the initiative to declare their independence from humankind. Not untill the first Earth - Qrion war ends with an unbearable death toll for humanity...

Damn, i should write a script about this... :p

mv
01-08-2004, 02:42 PM
:wip: go for it! but potentially 63000 people can be aware of it... so delete it before it's too late :D

PhilOsirus
01-08-2004, 03:58 PM
If the Martian atmosphere were to be completely cleansed of dust, the daytime sky would appear blue, just as our own sky because of Rayleigh scattering by the molecules (primarily carbon dioxide molecules) which make up the atmosphere.

From NASA FAQ (http://humbabe.arc.nasa.gov/mgcm/faq/sky.html).

And I didn't mean to send life-size Monstertrucks, only remote controlled toys like they sell at Toys-R-Us. Make it more efficient and solar-powered that's all.

betelgeuse
01-08-2004, 05:04 PM
Anyone notice the unusual nature of the soil that was disturbed by the Mars rover's airbags? From this >>link (http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/science/0104/07mars.html)<<:

Even more stunning, however, was a "bizarre" patch of disturbed, wrinkled soil photographed at the base of the rover's landing platform that left scientists flabbergasted.

"It looks like mud, but can't be mud," said Cornell University astronomer Steven Squyres. "We don't know what it is, but it's definitely not like anything we have ever seen before."

Scientists suspect that the mystery feature is some kind of "duracrust" on the soil surface that was disturbed when the rover retracted its air bags after landing.

But instead of showing the kind of dusty scuff marks that might have been expected, the soil was peeled back in a twisted, ropy-looking mass that scientists would only describe as "really weird."

"The folks on our team that are interested in soils are going to have a blast with this," Squyres said.

Some scientists speculated that it might be a kind of thin crust formed by chemical action between Mars' iron-rich soil and the atmosphere.

But some speculated that it might have been formed by moisture working its way up from beneath the soil. At one point in Mars' distant past, the landing site is believed to have been the floor of a 100-mile-wide lake.

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040106a/PIA04998_br.jpg

quid
01-08-2004, 08:01 PM
Phil "Osirus" How about toy trucks driven by Qrios!

Dennik you could incorporate it into your screenplay. Qrios, they work hard and yes they play hard... sea monkies on mars... with toy jeeps.

Oh and that formation is sure strange. I noticed it when the link was first posted. It seemed odd to me that the sediment layer would be so thin to reveal what looks like to m to be a sedimentary rock formation (that is if it really was a lake in the past). It’s too damn cold to be mud.

paintbox
01-08-2004, 08:37 PM
Originally posted by quid
It’s too damn cold to be mud.

Unless ofcourse, there is thermal activity underneath the surface.

betelgeuse
01-08-2004, 09:12 PM
Originally posted by paintbox
Unless ofcourse, there is thermal activity underneath the surface.

That could be, but I would think you'd see steam rising up from the ground in the photos.

quid
01-09-2004, 06:37 AM
As the entire landing site is supposed to be a big impact crater, what if it's just some solidified molten rock that was created by the heat of the meteorite impact?

There is a news "leak" (http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20040109/pl_nm/campaign_bush_florida_dc_3) that Bush is to issue a statement next week to call for a manned mission to Mars. Perhaps he is finally listening to the folks at the mars society (http://www.marssociety.org/) Check out the audio files for Robert Zubrin's senate testimony that can be found here (http://www.marssociety.org/news/2003/1029.asp) Good stuff.

playmesumch00ns
01-09-2004, 08:32 AM
To me it looks like lots of really fine, really heavy dust (it does contain a large amount of iron after all). Powders behave a lot like liquids in the right state.

The ultimate answer is that it's always something mundane...

Rotamus
01-09-2004, 08:34 AM
this picture rocks! (pun)

hehe looking at the picture i thought it would keep going till i was the sky again :D amazing stuff .....

hehe reminds me of the middle of australia .... red....dead....boring....not very good lag :scream:

K Dawg
01-09-2004, 11:15 AM
Originally posted by Phil "Osirus"
From NASA FAQ (http://humbabe.arc.nasa.gov/mgcm/faq/sky.html).

And I didn't mean to send life-size Monstertrucks, only remote controlled toys like they sell at Toys-R-Us. Make it more efficient and solar-powered that's all.

Oh ok, I understood the Monster Truck thing wrong. Didnīt wanna offend you.

And the therory about the Mars sky i just Quoted from a German Science serie from the past.

Thx for the link of information, but the NASA link itself said, the Sky on mars would be White then, not blue ;)

betelgeuse
01-09-2004, 12:33 PM
Originally posted by K Dawg
... but the NASA link itself said, the Sky on mars would be White then, not blue ;)

I don't think you read the whole article because it states quite clearly that, if the dust could be removed from the atmosphere, the sky would be blue. It would, of course, fade off to a whitish color toward the horizon just like it does on Earth.

And the blue color here on Earth and potentially on Mars is not dependent on water or water vapor at all. It is simply Rayleigh scattering of light off the gas molecules of the atmosphere itself.

Browse this site (http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/atmos/blusky.html) for a great discussion of Rayleigh scattering, Mie scattering, etc...

Z1K0B4
01-09-2004, 02:27 PM
those marks on the surface, from what i understand, are trails from the airbags?

K Dawg
01-09-2004, 04:20 PM
Ok I know the Mars expedition is very interesting and I like such things too, but why is everyone so fixed on that stuff? does someone someday wanna set the rumour, there are Aliens up there? I mean, sure it is interesting and so, but the they the media (here in germany) are talking over it, is like, it is something but what we donīt know, could it be a life form who did that?
I mean, Look at mars and what life form could be alive up there? ok I donīt say that maybe in the past there was no life, it could be. But the factis that Mars is just a waste land, an interesting one too.

Well I better shut up an this topic cause I guess I didnīt make any friends here in this topic :D

t-toe
01-09-2004, 07:41 PM
yeah, they are supposed to be airbag-related... but I still don't quite understand how...

oh well. guess that's why I don't work at NASA.

betelgeuse
01-12-2004, 05:49 PM
Nasa just posted a 3D reconstruction (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040112a/airbag_drag_mark_3d-A10R1.jpg) of the airbag scuff marks on the ground around the rover. It gives a great sense of depth of the area. Oh, and check out their custom "Planet Viz" software. I love the "Planets" and "Rover" icons. What do you suppose happens when you click on it?:)

It also points out that they have an exceptional understanding of the terrain in the immediate vicinity of the rover before the roll it off the pad.

Man, I'm looking forward to rover scuttling around on the ground. Perhaps Wednesday or Thursday.

HamsaPaksham
01-13-2004, 04:03 PM
Hahah, Amazing Photo. BUT, itīs kind comic.

I wouldnīt doubt there is life in Mars.
And it wouldnīt surprise me if this life is more advanced (spiritually and technically), and I would also not be surprised if they tricking us...

Because itīs to dangerous to an advaced civilization, to get in contact with us...

We still have war, we still hate, we still kill, we still think we have the power to dictate, to slave...

Were still barbarians thinking we are so "civilized".

CGTalk Moderation
01-17-2006, 02:00 AM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.