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JA-forreal
12-16-2003, 08:19 PM
I just had a Western Digital 7.2k rpm hard drive fail on me. I was wondering if extensive video editing and capture to a hard drive can damage it. The drive only had one partition. But I was wondering if splitting up an 120 gig or larger hard drive into two or more partitions could protect it in some way from failure? Is it better to use one section for capture, one for editing, and one for file storage?

singularity2006
12-16-2003, 08:30 PM
sure, extensive use may wear down the needle reader over the platter but it takes quite a bit of work before a drive dies out like that. How long ago did you purchase the drive? If it's still under warranty, have it replaced. Anyhow, as for partitioning, I don't think it would have made a difference. The platter is still spinning and the needle is still reading. You might have just gotten the short end of the stick and gotten a defective hard drive.

JA-forreal
12-16-2003, 08:38 PM
Well, the warranty ended. I got the drive two years ago. It's good to know that I didn't do the damage. Thanks for the info.

singularity2006
12-16-2003, 11:03 PM
2 years? That's quite a while. If u did nothing but video editing that whole time, then that's a pretty dang good work horse of a HD.

imashination
12-16-2003, 11:56 PM
Originally posted by singularity2006
2 years? That's quite a while. If u did nothing but video editing that whole time, then that's a pretty dang good work horse of a HD.

Are you serious? for a HD to die after 2 years of video editing is piss poor. The HD should last until its size and speed make it redundant.

singularity2006
12-17-2003, 12:19 AM
heh, I guess u got a point there. I have a habit of changing HD's every 2 years because by 2 years or 3, it starts making funny noises or it feels slow.

CourtJester
12-17-2003, 03:51 AM
I would expect the constant thrashing of Winblows and application loading (10 bytes here, a .dll there, 45 bytes way over there, then right back here for 6.3k of splash screen, blah blah blah) beats up drives much faster than the relatively sedate step-step-step of megabytes of usually contiguous video & capture data.

JA-forreal
12-17-2003, 05:35 AM
I guess that I will stick to Maxtor drives. I have had one placed on top of a case in a storage room for two years that worked. Even though it was exposed to the elements it works fine. All of my Maxtor drives are in good working order. I have other Western Digi hard drives. I'm guessing that they are not the best drives.

Novakog
12-17-2003, 06:13 AM
I've never heard of a HD dying after 2 yrs. My family has a lot of old computers (as well as some new ones) and we have HDs 3 yrs old, 5 yrs old, we even have a 7 yr old gateway computer that works fine.

Thorlyn
12-17-2003, 06:36 PM
I agree with CourtJester on load/reliablity

Video is a very mild application for HDD. They need to be fast but it dosnt wear on them.
In my experiance WD drives dont last all that long. 2 years isnt bad. I have some die after 3 monthes and have never had one last longer than 3 years (ive been through about 7 WDs). IBM used to be good but not so much now. Seagate is my current favorite. Maxtors arnt bad either. But in reality, IDE/SATA drives just suck in general. Thats why they are so cheap. They are a great value, just not the best quality. Dont count on them too much.

Ice Czar
12-17-2003, 10:10 PM
Originally posted by singularity2006
sure, extensive use may wear down the needle reader over the platter

err...Head fly height (http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/op/heads/op.htm)
provided you avoid headslap\head crash,
there is no wear to the head itself

Partitioning Strategies (http://partition.radified.com/)

Which Brand of Hard Drive is Most Reliable? (http://www.storagereview.com/php/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=BrandMostReliable&PHPSESSID=e787907d327bea85cdefef19ece6a17c) @ SR FAQ

Ive had 12xWestern Digital HDDs for 3 years without a single failure (6 in a RAID 5)

JA-forreal
12-18-2003, 06:56 AM
Originally posted by Ice Czar
err...Head fly height (http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/op/heads/op.htm)
provided you avoid headslap\head crash,
there is no wear to the head itself

Partitioning Strategies (http://partition.radified.com/)

Which Brand of Hard Drive is Most Reliable? (http://www.storagereview.com/php/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=BrandMostReliable&PHPSESSID=e787907d327bea85cdefef19ece6a17c) @ SR FAQ

Ive had 12xWestern Digital HDDs for 3 years without a single failure (6 in a RAID 5)

Thanks for the links. I will have to apply this the next time I setup my systems.

parallax
12-18-2003, 10:52 AM
MTBF (Mean time between failures) is about a few million hours these days.
A modern drive should last AT LEAST a few (2) years.
4-5 years is more likely.

Ice Czar
12-18-2003, 12:39 PM
If it doesnt die within a few months
from improper handling damage (vendor>shipper>installation)
and provided it has the proper environment
(no vibration>cooling>clean air>and no impacts, even minor, during operation)

a good guide
Seagate Online Training Resource - Proper Handling Guide (http://www.seagate.com/training/properhandling/munitintro.html)

may favorite qoute (regarding headslap)
"As a result of the impact, tiny indentations can be formed. The material ejected from this impact is scattered about the disc, and when the drive is powered up the heads will pass over this indentation and the ejected material. This can be the equivalent of running over a bowling ball in a go-cart traveling at Mach 813."

3Dfx_Sage
12-18-2003, 05:23 PM
SCSI drives are built to much higher standards and are MUCH more reliable. That's why a 7 year warranty is standard on SCSI drives. You pay a lot more, if if the data is worth it....

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