PDA

View Full Version : SSD vs 15000 rpm Sata


x70
01-23-2013, 01:22 AM
For a 3ds max / maya work station what's going to make the system faster?

ThE_JacO
01-23-2013, 01:38 AM
It's tough to beat an SSD for the OS/Apps/Pages/Caches side of things.
Some thunderbolt offerings based on magnetic drives come scary close and even beat SSDs in some scenarios, but those are usually RAID 0 or 10 10k disks with a very large buffer on a successfully designed interface.

Go for SSD for your system/apps drive (back up regularly, they are finnicky and short lived), and don't cheapen out too much on one, and run large and cheap drives in raid for data if you need speed (comp, editing etc.).

Last but not least: Post topics in the appropriate forums, please.
This should have been in the hardware section, not GD.

SheepFactory
01-23-2013, 01:41 AM
I wouldn't say SSD's are finnicky or short lived. If you are talking about the write limit nobody is going to hit that anytime soon. Even if you do you can still read from them so it is easy to transfer to a new SSD. A mechanical drive is way more prone to failure and data loss.

Panupat
01-23-2013, 01:43 AM
Talking of pure speed you really can't beat SSD.

The 10k/15k RPM drives' biggest advantage over standard 7200RPM drives is their higher access time. The spin speed does increase read/write but not substantially. And I believe you'll need quite an expensive SAS controller and RAID 0 to get the most out of them.

So, for loading OS and application, I'll go SSD. And I'd use RAID0 15k rpm for video editing storage.

ThE_JacO
01-23-2013, 02:03 AM
I wouldn't say SSD's are finnicky or short lived. If you are talking about the write limit nobody is going to hit that anytime soon. Even if you do you can still read from them so it is easy to transfer to a new SSD. A mechanical drive is way more prone to failure and data loss.
SSDs have a high frequency of failure.
On a personal experience level I've had one losing data several times over a slow death, one die completely, one on a laptop (my GF's) freak the F out and nearly dying, and have heard first hand the same from quite a few friends, all in the last two years.

Comparatively the 3 10k SATA drives in RAID5 in my NAS (two years old), the two in raid0 in my workstation (now 4yo), and all the laptop sized ones in my two playstations, laptop etc have never once failed in the last five years.

SSDs ARE known to be early failure drives. Intel is the only brand that has managed to keep failures in the first six months under 2%, and in the first year under 5% (compared to less than a fifth for magnetic drives), the cheaper brands often sport a double digit failure rate in the first six months of life (when firmware issues and bad luck kick in, usually the chances of failure drop drastically if your drive makes it past that mark and increase steadily with age more normally).

This has got better in the last year (exponentially), and is largely not due to architectural/technological issues, most often it's a mix of firmware and glitches more so than the component themselves dying. It STILL is worth keeping an out eye for, especially if you get tempted to buy less reputable brands.

I would still advise buying one, but I think it wise to be prepared to be part of that 5% that finally has everything down pat after 2 months of installing downloading and configuring and then gets smacked on the ass with data loss, or even hard failure. All it takes is a cheap-arse second hand magnetic somewhere you keep an updated clone of your SSD on.

hypercube
01-23-2013, 02:03 AM
SSDs can't be overstated for how ridiculously fast they make your overall system..you start to realize how much time was spent waiting for things to load.

Edit: I've also lost more mechanical drives than I can even count, it happens to everything, you just have to roll with it.

imashination
01-23-2013, 10:47 AM
For a 3ds max / maya work station what's going to make the system faster?

To answer the OP's question though, if you mean what makes working in maya faster or what makes rendering animations faster; the answer is neither. Unless youre running pre-cached liquid simulations of doom, the harddrive speed is the last thing you should worry about for a 3D machine.

dmeyer
01-23-2013, 01:02 PM
To answer the OP's question though, if you mean what makes working in maya faster or what makes rendering animations faster; the answer is neither. Unless youre running pre-cached liquid simulations of doom, the harddrive speed is the last thing you should worry about for a 3D machine.

Except in Maya, it crashes frequently enough that the boot times do add up.

CGTalk Moderation
01-23-2013, 01:02 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.