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View Full Version : Modeling, Animation, VFX, Architectural Vis or...?


Bijingus
01-15-2013, 06:08 AM
My question is where is there demand for people in the industry right now? I'm planning on taking the next while to build a portfolio, but I'm not sure what would be the best kind of portfolio to build. I'm interested in all of the above and then some. Is there any room or demand for generalists, or would it be better to build a very specific portfolio? I'm in the Vancouver area btw. I know this may be the kind of question with no straight answer, but any sort of feedback would be helpful. I've always had a hard time narrowing down my interests. Although I'd lean further toward modeling, animation and texturing than VFX, Architectural Vis or the more technical aspects of CG like compositing or rotoscoping (Which I know little about anyway). I just don't want to end up spending months or a year+ on a modeling portfolio for example only to find out that it's next to impossible to find work, or that the pay is terrible or something along those lines.

Any thoughts and opinions would be greatly appreciated!

Bijingus
01-15-2013, 06:10 AM
Woops, Posted this in the wrong section!

artzolio
01-23-2013, 03:34 AM
My question is where is there demand for people in the industry right now? I'm planning on taking the next while to build a portfolio, but I'm not sure what would be the best kind of portfolio to build. I'm interested in all of the above and then some. Is there any room or demand for generalists, or would it be better to build a very specific portfolio? I'm in the Vancouver area btw. I know this may be the kind of question with no straight answer, but any sort of feedback would be helpful. I've always had a hard time narrowing down my interests. Although I'd lean further toward modeling, animation and texturing than VFX, Architectural Vis or the more technical aspects of CG like compositing or rotoscoping (Which I know little about anyway). I just don't want to end up spending months or a year+ on a modeling portfolio for example only to find out that it's next to impossible to find work, or that the pay is terrible or something along those lines.

Any thoughts and opinions would be greatly appreciated!

My suggestion is to go into a job fair and ask what are companies looking for, and specify you're a student learning what are the skills required to work with the companies there. Attend to siggraph for example. That would give you a great idea of what is going on, and will happen. I know the ticket might be a couple of hundred dollars, but its worth it considering you're about to spend thousands of dollars worth education.

Its easier to find a job as a rotoscoping artist and a compositor, than a modeler, texturing or animation artist. Compositors help put things together. They are glue for anything that includes a team of more than one person. You can avoid rotoscoping if you work JUST with animation, and no live action. You will not find a lot of clients that don't want to put a real representation of their product, actor, etc. So i would at least learn the basics on that.

Do you have any friends who are in VFX or animation industry working? Are there any public groups that gather weekly or monthly to share CG or such? Don't hide behind the monitor, expecting to find the answers to a CG job behind a computer. Most of the valuable information will come from someone talking infront of you. Go out, and talk to people. Yes, its ironical that this is an internet post, but don't you think this comment would make more sense if I was there in person saying it?

You're in Vancouver. There is industry there. Make some phone calls and ask companies what they are looking for. The worst that can happen, is that you become smarter, the best, you might land an internship

Cesar Montero - Surfacing Artist @ DreamWorks Animation - Artzolio.org

Bijingus
01-25-2013, 06:15 AM
Thanks for the detailed response. Gives me a lot to think about. It's easy to get stuck behind a computer monitor and forget about the real world sometimes. I'll look into Sigraph and see what's going on where I am.

Thanks again.

MrPositive
01-28-2013, 02:25 AM
I'm just going to chime in to reiterate what was said by artzolio. The most reoccurring pattern of those getting hired from my decade of instruction is by those who were a) willing to attend festivals such as siggraph and make connections and generally just feel like there is a bigger world out there and b) those that are fine with finding work outside their local living areas. If you are only looking in your local city then you are greatly decreasing your prospects for work (unless it's LA, NYC, or London) I guess. I also see students put out a demo reel for 1 place. 1 freakin place! What happens when you don't hit that jackpot? You just quit? I'd apply almost everywhere especially if you KNOW your work is up to snuff. Lastly, to find out what jobs are most in demand, it never hurts to try and get an internship in your final year of school. I'd say 75% of the students that have done internships were simply hired after it ended. You'll get to see hands on the production pipeline and figure out where you could fit in best. In the end however, you are going to find work where you most succeed and do the best art, plain and simple. So continue to search, discover, and experience what excites and and excels you in the industry.

Now to be more specific about your question, I'd say that only putting out a modeling reel is really specializing yourself for one type of job. That could be good and bad I guess. Most of the top demo reels these days on cgtalk tend to at least do a 'beautiful pictures' demo reel, meaning modeling, texturing, and lighting. If you are going to be extremely specialized like a character modeler or texture painter only demo reel, you had better be phenomenal in my opinion as it's only getting tougher to get hired. In the end, many of the jobs WILL be that specialized but having a slightly more varied reel does give you more prospects. You also mentioned animation, which is extremely difficult to get hired unless you've been quite thoroughly trained or experienced to a polished level. Animators are just that, animators and they ARE very specialized. Honestly, I'd say that comp artists are most likely in the most demand from what I hear back from my former students, but not everybody wants or is good enough to do that. Hope that helps from my side.

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