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View Full Version : Advice for i7 3930K Based Computer


arthurG
11-19-2012, 06:40 PM
Hello,
I will soon buy a new computer for my studies (mainly vfx, dynamics, fluids, Maya, Houdini).
I have made a list of components which seem fine to me but maybe someone could have better ideas. I chose a mid level graphic card because I think to not need a lot of gpu computation. I prefer to take a 6 core cpu and a lot of ram. What do you think in regard of the software I use ? I didn't choose a ssd neither.
I have a budget around 1800, but prices are high in France.
Thanks a lot.

CPU : Intel Core i7-3930K
MB : ASUS P9X79
Power : Corsair Professional Series Gold AX750 80PLUS Gold
Ram : Corsair Vengeance Series 32 Go (4 x 8 Go) DDR3 1600 MHz CL9
HD : Seagate Barracuda 7200.14 SATA 6Gb/s 2 To
GC : ZOTAC GeForce GTX 660Ti AMP ! Edition 2GB
Case : Antec P280
Fan: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011
DVD Drive, Keyboard,...

sentry66
11-19-2012, 08:47 PM
looks good except you can't use the corsair vengeance memory with the noctua cooler. The heatfins are too tall. Get ram sticks that are low profile or can have the heatfins easily removed like the corsair dominator memory

Though note that you can use vengeance memory if you use a hair dryer to warm up the glue on the memory and then carefully remove the heatfins and rub the excess glue off. You'd only need to do that to the memory going in the slots directly under the noctua cooler.


You didn't say what video card you'll be using, so it's hard to say if 750 watts will be enough or not.

arthurG
11-19-2012, 09:23 PM
Thanks for the memory advice! I will choose the Corsair Low Profile, though it's CL10.
For the video card I think of the ZOTAC GeForce GTX 660Ti AMP ! Edition 2GB.
Is 750W not enough if I want to upgrade the video card or add a hard drive later ?

sentry66
11-19-2012, 10:11 PM
750 watt should be fine for that card and additional hard drives

If you were going to overclock the CPU, I'd probably go with a 850 watt

olson
11-19-2012, 11:53 PM
750 watt should be fine for that card and additional hard drives

If you were going to overclock the CPU, I'd probably go with a 850 watt

A 750 watt power supply is overkill for the build. A 500 watt power supply would be about right if you want to save some bucks. Certainly no need for 850 watts though. :surprised

ThE_JacO
11-20-2012, 12:02 AM
It'd depend from the power supply and how clean each rail (because 99% of the solid but affordable ones are balanced multi-rail) is.
I agree the overall draw will probably be fine with a 500, but it's not like a 750 will burn more energy, and there's a big step in quality noise wise, but not price, between 500 and 650+.

Personally I hate noise, so my graphic card, case and PSU were chosen based on those parameters, and I couldn't be happier with what I have; at full load you can barely hear it from under an open desk less than a metre away from my ears.

850, definitely overkill, 750, possibly a bit overkill yeah, although a well priced one with good fans and a fan speed + thermostatic regulation would be worth it IMO. 500W, again considering the offers out there not just the number, might be saving a penny to spend a pound. There are some very good, very silent 650s that won't break the piggy bank out there worth considering IMO.

Edit: @OP adding drives won't be an issue, they hardly draw anything (you're talking less than 6W at idle and less than 30 at full spin, you'd have to have 4 in raid 10 moving as fast as they can to see a 100-130 pull). You wouldn't notice the difference between having 8 vs 2.
Adding another card might be a bit of a draw increase, but 750 would more than cover it, as would 650 really, if it's a good PSU since you will be pulling from two different sets.
Bear in mind SLI is hardly worth the bother for CGI still, so unless you also want to abuse this as a gaming setup, then it probably isn't worth the money.

olson
11-20-2012, 12:54 AM
A little extra wattage can be useful down the road, but a lot can be a bad thing. For example I have a 1200 watt power supply in a machine that needs about half that and it trips the UPS overload protection when turning on (but doesn't with a smaller power supply on the same machine). More powerful power supplies can take up a lot of space in the case which can be really annoying.

For the record the only reason I bought that huge power supply is Asus technical support insisted my 700 watt power supply was insufficient and was causing problems (which it wasn't) and they wouldn't RMA a board until I tried a larger power supply. Also Asus technical support is terrible. Did I mention Asus technical support is terrible?

Back to the point of the power supply I think the best builds have a power supply appropriate for the needs of the components and people usually way overestimate what a build actually needs. Good luck to the original poster with the new build.

arthurG
11-20-2012, 09:09 PM
Thanks all for the replies !

imashination
11-21-2012, 10:21 AM
If a 1200watt psu can trip your fuses... Id suggest theres more a problem with the circuit youre plugging into. A vacuum or hair-dryer will pull several times that.

olson
11-21-2012, 02:09 PM
If a 1200watt psu can trip your fuses... Id suggest theres more a problem with the circuit youre plugging into. A vacuum or hair-dryer will pull several times that.

Sure, but I don't run a hair dryer or vacuum from the UPS. ;)

tswalk
11-22-2012, 07:35 AM
If a 1200watt psu can trip your fuses....


i've experienced this before with a UPS in-line... scary shat, but ya, the outlet was not grounded well and tripped the circuit.. protected my computer, ruined the UPS though.

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