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shockeddesign
12-07-2003, 06:39 PM
The picture that I posted was an image of a guitar I'm trying to create. Can anyone explain the circled area of my model I pointed out. Why when I subpatched did my model come out that way?

-Joe

Para
12-07-2003, 06:46 PM
You can subpatch only 3 point and 4 point polies (known as triangles and quads). If you want to subpatch the big ngon, I'd bevel it with some inset and then triple it. There are other ways to achieve the same result, though.

slow67
12-07-2003, 06:47 PM
it looks like the face of your guitar is one big Ngon(poly with more than 4 sides), lightwave's subpatches doesnt support Ngons, So you will need to create the guitars face with 4 and or 3 sided polygons in order to supatch it.

shockeddesign
12-07-2003, 09:26 PM
thanks alot...i figured this much but wanted some extra opinions.

thanks again - Joe

leigh
12-07-2003, 09:30 PM
It's not a matter of opinion, it's a fact :p

As has been mentioned, only 3- and 4-sided polys can be subpatched, and even then you should avoid using 3-sided polys as much as possible.

Quads are your friends.

LFGabel
12-07-2003, 09:51 PM
Yes, but so are >4 pointed polys in certain applications... if your mesh isn't going to deform

Just take your guitar face, the one with >4 point polys, bevel it with a slight inset and zero shift twice, then set th e Sub-D weight on the resulting >4 point poly to 100%.

It will look fine and render fine in Sub-D.

Steve Warner
12-07-2003, 10:13 PM
Hi Joe,

If you really want to subpatch this, you can use Cman's Poly Subdivide Plugin (http://www.m2estudios.com/Subdivide.htm) to make the n-gon at the top of your guitar sub-d friendly. But I'd advise you to skip the sub-d approach altogether and model this with standard polys. Sub-Ds are great, but they work best for organic objects that have flexibility in their form. If you move the points of a sub-d object even slightly, you can easily wind up with an object that looks like it's made out of clay. Not good for a guitar, unless it's a stylized cartoon version. Sub-d's will also slow down your render, so the direct poly-modeling approach would also be beneficial here as well.

If you are using Sub-d's because they're simply making it easy for you to get a smooth edge, you might want to consider freezing the subpatch polys and then welding the top of your guitar (the n-gon) to the quad sides.

Another approach would be to extrude your n-gon, then use
JettoBevel (http://www.3dfightclub.com/~jettocrack/lightwave/plugins/jettobevel/index.htm) to round off the top and bottom. That's the technique I use for most of the panels I build (and they have plenty of n-gons). It works like a charm:

http://www.trinitymediainc.com/Temp/Panels.jpg

Hope this helps!

Steve

shockeddesign
12-08-2003, 12:12 AM
thanks steve for going in-depth with that. everything is good now and I think i'm going to try both approaches

SplineGod
12-08-2003, 08:23 AM
Steve,
Nice job on that control panel :)

shockeddesign
12-08-2003, 01:37 PM
Hey spline god I just realized your living in LA. Well next July my brother and I are going to college out there. "the art institute of los angeles" - maybe I'll see you there sometime!

-Joe

SplineGod
12-09-2003, 04:40 AM
Originally posted by shockeddesign
Hey spline god I just realized your living in LA. Well next July my brother and I are going to college out there. "the art institute of los angeles" - maybe I'll see you there sometime!

-Joe
Hey thats cool!
You should come by the LAUsers group. Got a nice bunch of LWers there. :)

st45
12-09-2003, 04:53 PM
Originally posted by Leigh
It's not a matter of opinion, it's a fact :p

As has been mentioned, only 3- and 4-sided polys can be subpatched, and even then you should avoid using 3-sided polys as much as possible.

Quads are your friends.

Yes but why? I posted this question in the main forum and haven't recieved any answer. Is it because it makes it easier to paint on a UV map?

SplineGod
12-09-2003, 06:24 PM
Originally posted by st45
Yes but why? I posted this question in the main forum and haven't recieved any answer. Is it because it makes it easier to paint on a UV map?
If you get a lot of triangles near each other it can create strange problems. Make a sphere and turn on SubDs. Look at the ends where all the triangles are together.

With organic models such as heads you want to be able to cleanly control the flow of your model. Flow is important for things like shadows and getting proper deformations. Triangles can sometimes make it more difficult to control the flow of edges.

As far as UV maps go I dont think triangles make it any harder ncessarily.

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