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View Full Version : what is the equivalent of windows user documents folder on Mac OS and linux based OS?


DEVILSAN
11-10-2012, 05:23 AM
I do not have a mac osx or linux machine but I am building app that runs on different platform that stores a users bookmarks, so i want to store user bookmarks to each users document folder I can do it on windows but for Linux or Mac OS I need to know where us the document equivalent folder or what is it called, for a specific user ?

cgbeige
11-10-2012, 02:35 PM
There is a ~/Documents folder in OS X but the best place to store documents like this is in ~/Library/Application Support, where ~ is the user folder (/Users/beige/Library/Application Support/Google/ for example). In Linux, the documents folder is in ~/Documents (/home/beige/Documents).

I suggest you get a copy of Parallels Desktop or VMWare Workstation and test a Linux and OS X VM. Relying on this type of info isn't going to solve your bugs.

tswalk
11-11-2012, 02:54 AM
or VirtualBox, totally free.

olson
11-11-2012, 03:03 AM
or VirtualBox, totally free.

I'm a big fan of VirtualBox so I'll second that. Too bad Oracle bought Sun and closed most of their projects or canceled them (knock on wood VirtualBox doesn't go away). For the original poster, most applications on Linux don't use stupid default folders like "Documents" to store things. If you put a period in front of the folder name it will be hidden by default on Linux. So you can make whatever folder you want in the home folder of the current user like ~/.purplemonkeydishwasher. If you show hidden files or list hidden files you'll see other folders like ~/.mozilla and they're doing the same thing.

cgbeige
11-11-2012, 03:41 AM
I review VM software and Virtualbox is free but it's flaky and I doubt you can get Mountain Lion up and running on it, while you can get Parallels and VMWare VMs running it no problem.

It would be fine for Linux clients though, even if 3D support is iffy.

olson
11-11-2012, 04:07 AM
I review VM software and Virtualbox is free but it's flaky and I doubt you can get Mountain Lion up and running on it, while you can get Parallels and VMWare VMs running it no problem.

It would be fine for Linux clients though, even if 3D support is iffy.

I think that depends on what you want it for. Their 3D graphics support is not as good as other virtual machine software but if you're not using the 3D graphics everything else is superb. I guess my opinion is biased since I use it mostly for stuff that doesn't require 3D graphics (wiki server, Outlook, etc.). It's also nice to just say "sudo apt-get install virtualbox" and have it less than a minute later. :thumbsup:

If I needed 3D graphics support I'd use a commercial product for sure. That's one area that the commercial solutions have down pretty well.

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