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TheMzk
10-28-2012, 01:38 PM
(First Off,
This might have been asked before, i tried searching but 'I' couldn't find anything. So if this kind of stuff has been asked before, I am Sorry. )

Okay!,
So..I am 16, Until a few months since a very long time i have been wanting to do animation and study it. BUT - I have a problem which MANY other people like me have. "I cant draw" - Now i could draw if i worked very hard and showed determination towards it, and in around 3-4 years i could draw, I did try doing that, But after a period of time, it became, how do i tell you? I mean my cousin works in an animation company, And i have been there a couple of times and seen people at work there, and i dont think i can draw that much every day of my life. i know there are different fields in animation where you dont have to draw, But Drawing is core. Now since i dont have fun doing it, i dont think animation is meant for me.
So then i jumped into VFX, Researched a bit online and saw what kind of work you have to do. Tried a bit myself, I mean not hardcore stuff. Just messing around with Green Screen, After Effects, Nuke and 3Ds Max (I have some experience in 3D software and programming).And i have to tell you, I am having fun. I can see myself doing this kind of stuff everyday of my life. And I'm not talking about the 'fun' stuff, even things like rotoscoping or matchmoving. I dont mind doing it, I like it. (My knowledge in this is not that good, So if i did say something wrong please correct me)
What do you guys think? How should i go forward studying it?
And what is this Course Called? I found it in SCAD, But other than that couldn't find it anywhere.

Andrewty07
10-29-2012, 05:26 PM
For now just keep experimenting and exploring with what you like, if your sure you want to pursue rotoscoping and compositing go right for it. Many schools have a visual effects oriented program that will cover those topics or you can find numerous resources to further teach yourself for free or limited costs online. Regardless of your specific field you end up pursuing, drawing is a very useful skill whether directly required by the line of work or not. It can greatly help an artists plan out work or visually express ideas that couldn't clearly be presented in plain words. When I am planning out an animation concept it is extremely valuable to sketch out some gesture drawings for my supervisor to see and get an idea of where I want to go before I invest many hours on animating.

Depending on your planning and financial situation look at schools like Gnomon, VFS, SVA, AAU. They should give you ideas of program choices so you can figure out what you want to get out of an education and ideas of what students gain from attending each.

patrickrowan
10-29-2012, 10:56 PM
FXPHD have great comp/roto courses with top quality footage that you can then use for your reel. its affordable and if you follow the classes well I know guys to get junior comp/roto positions off the back of the footage that they provided. obviously putting in the extra work too. you dont need to be able to draw. its more about developing your eye which photography can work well too and you will just pick it up as you go(developing your eye). most people ive worked with cant draw and the higher you up u go the more technical and unintuitive it gets and the processes usually can suck the creativity out of it. for an entry level position all you need to do is show you have the basics down,your enthusiastic and your reel is decent.check out fxphd for the footage and price you cant beat it.

TheMzk
10-30-2012, 05:20 PM
Alright,
I think ill join the next fxphd term, As i have exams in these months.
I will still try working on my drawings, i anyways draw in school when i am bored as there is nothing better to do.
Thank You for your advice. :)

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