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monarts
09-21-2012, 01:48 AM
Hi all,
I am back into blender quiet after a long time and it looks like I need to start everything again.

So how blender is doing now a days in 3d industry? Is it catching up? I have been expecting blender defeating the monopoly of Autodesk ( though I am a Maya fan). I would like to hear from Blender addicts.

Thank you...

colkai
09-21-2012, 08:21 AM
I very much doubt Blender would become a top level industry tool s a main program.
That said, it is coming on tremendously and in terms of playing catch-up. make no mistake, there are professional software packages out there that are still chasing what Blender can already do in some aspects.

Is 2.6 better than 2.4? absolutely, plus, factor in the fact it is free and there really isn't any reason not to having sat on your machine, especially for a hobbyist, it provides access to a level of 3D one could only dream of 10 years ago.

RorrKonn
09-23-2012, 08:52 PM
Blender has a lot of tools for the price.
Not necessary the fastest work flow.
I use Blender mostly for UV Mapping.

A lot of you tube tutrails.

I like the Blender Sintel mini movie on you tube also.

monarts
09-25-2012, 01:23 AM
Thanks... wish more people to share.

Redz
09-26-2012, 01:37 PM
I personally would love to see Blender be used more openly in production pipelines, not that there is any reason it shouldn't be. The fact that it is free may actually work against it in some ways, but that's just my opinion.

It is a great package for what it delivers even when you look at the competition. For example; if you are looking at testing out some ideas for real-time gaming, it is quite simple to rough out some quick results with the BGE. Once you invest some time into the workflow and get to know the tools, it can be very powerful. Since they've made the shortcuts customizable, I feel more at home with it.

I think what interests me the most about Blender is the transparency of the development. What other company out there shows you some of the latest features that are currently in development like they do? Trust me, this app has it's flaws, but it shouldn't be overlooked by any means.

DanielWray
09-26-2012, 10:45 PM
It is used. Autodesk, being the large entity that it is, gets more coverage though. Always.

Modo, Zbrush, Foundry tools, &c. are all used in the industry but they are talked about less; Well perhaps Nuke, and a few of the foundry tools. I believe that is down, again, to the marketing money that the Foundry pours into interviews, advertisements and so on.

Either way, it shouldn't matter. If you become a highly talented, creative, passionate artist using Blender then there is no disadvantage to you. You're still what the industry is after.

aelex
10-04-2012, 04:24 PM
As you asked to hear from some addicts:
I love Blender! I use it since six years now and I am impressed every time when there is a new update with new functions. There are so many possibilities (although at the moment I only know how to use a veeeery small amount of them). What I consider the best thing is: You are always up to date and you never need to pay for that. Of course one should donate as soon as Blender is used on a professional basis. Blender might still be harder to get used to if one compares it to other software but I think if somebody is trained to use it AND knows where all the functions can be found, a lot of things are possible in Blender. Maybe not less than in the other programs. People just always think that something that is for free can not be high quality. This might be the case with a lot of other software but not with Blender in my opinion.

leigh
10-04-2012, 10:30 PM
It is used.

Not really. I've never, ever heard of a studio using it. Ever.

Although I'm not saying that means it's never been used on anything, but rather that if it is, then it's so incredibly rare that it's barely a blip on the radar. Out of the hundreds and hundreds of people I've worked with over the years, I've never known anyone who uses Blender, let alone a studio that has even so much as considered using it.

Blender will never be adopted by the overwhelming majority of studios out there for a number of reasons that I can't really be bothered to explain, suffice to say that anyone who has worked on any productions will understand the complexity of studio pipelines and the reasons why certain software choices are made.

It's not, contrary to pervasive beliefs, simply due to Autodesk's marketing. Maya and other packages are firmly embedded in studio's pipelines because they work, and once a studio has invested years of R&D developing a pipeline and proprietary tools around a certain package, then they're not going to change.

colkai
10-05-2012, 09:04 AM
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost.php?p=7430511&postcount=35

Though I agree, it is never going to be a big hitter, but like Lightwave, it may find a part in the pipeline even if it isn't the main tool.
Just as some Lightwave users are finding Blender is far more suited to certain tasks than mucking about with workarounds in LW.
One main thing of course, studios, like development houses, have a lot of time and money invested in people becoming highly adept at a given package / programming language so it's highly unlikely that a switch would occur unless something fundamental / catastrophic changes.
It took my old firm many years to bite the bullet and adopt a new main package and it did not come easy. Training folks up to the new system, even with it's considerable benefits, took time.
So overall, yep, cannot see it ever being a main package at anything other than small independent studios / "one man bands".

As much as even the biggest fan may wish that, time and money rules everything, whether we like it or not.

leigh
10-05-2012, 01:07 PM
Though I agree, it is never going to be a big hitter, but like Lightwave, it may find a part in the pipeline even if it isn't the main tool.

I still disagree with this. A pipeline isn't simply a list of the software used in a studio. A studio's pipeline refers to the studio's entire automated and supported software backend; ie it's the glue that holds everything together. Proprietary asset handling/loading/publishing tools form one of the basic elements of any studio's pipeline, and they're written for the chosen 3D package of the studio (which in my own field is generally Maya). This is why additional packages can't simply be added into a studio at whim, as any package used needs to have a supported inlet and outlet into the pipeline, and this takes R&D time. And in the world of games, post production, etc time is money. At the end of the day, there's nothing that Blender can do that Maya can't, so there's no need to spend money on R&D development to incorporate it into the studio.

I realise that with individual artists there's more flexibility to go with the package that you personally prefer using. But with studios it's fundamentally different due to the above. A Blender user can't go to a studio and ask to use Blender for their own daily work because that's just not going to fly. Using a couple of different packages on your projects at home is one thing, but trying to do that when you're working together and sharing assets with anywhere up to hundreds of other artists is another thing entirely.

I don't mean this to sound condescending so please excuse me in advance if it does, but the impression I always get from discussions like these is that those who believe that Blender will find a place in the industry have simply never worked in a developed studio environment.

KayosIII
10-09-2012, 05:02 PM
I still disagree with this. A pipeline isn't simply a list of the software used in a studio. A studio's pipeline refers to the studio's entire automated and supported software backend; ie it's the glue that holds everything together. Proprietary asset handling/loading/publishing tools form one of the basic elements of any studio's pipeline, and they're written for the chosen 3D package of the studio (which in my own field is generally Maya). This is why additional packages can't simply be added into a studio at whim, as any package used needs to have a supported inlet and outlet into the pipeline, and this takes R&D time. And in the world of games, post production, etc time is money. At the end of the day, there's nothing that Blender can do that Maya can't, so there's no need to spend money on R&D development to incorporate it into the studio.

I realise that with individual artists there's more flexibility to go with the package that you personally prefer using. But with studios it's fundamentally different due to the above. A Blender user can't go to a studio and ask to use Blender for their own daily work because that's just not going to fly. Using a couple of different packages on your projects at home is one thing, but trying to do that when you're working together and sharing assets with anywhere up to hundreds of other artists is another thing entirely.

I don't mean this to sound condescending so please excuse me in advance if it does, but the impression I always get from discussions like these is that those who believe that Blender will find a place in the industry have simply never worked in a developed studio environment.

I think I should weigh in here (I am a pipeline guy). A typical movie studio pipeline that I am familiar with looks something like this.

The render engine is PRMan or 3Delight. Houdini is the main control app - This is where your assets will end up. There is a lot of inter app scripting usually in a high level language like Python or Perl. (there are also in app scripts that help make the artists lives more efficient - We like Python here because lots of apps support it but whatever gets the job done). Larger studios might also have some custom in house tools with more scripts to speed the process up. Smaller studios sometimes have to outsource chunks of work so the pipeline has to be flexible enough to handle this as well. I have had a chance to talk to the owner of a local studio about this a few years ago - his position was that he would incorporate Blender into the pipeline if there was demand from the artists. Adding support for a new package to a pipeline isn't as difficult as choosing packages for which a large number of highly talented and proficient artists are available.
I guess in some ways it's a bit of a chicken and egg problem. Now I think you a right in that I don't expect any major studio to add Blender to the pipeline any time soon.

What I wouldn't be as surprised to see happening though is a number of small studios starting out with blender as a core of the pipeline. This year I have become involved in the local indy game scene. Basically all the game studios that used to be in my part of the world are now dead so the indy game scene is the only game scene. There are a lot of people trying to put together things on a shoestring budget so I don't think you will suprised to here that Blender is quite popular in these circles (especially given how much more we pay for Autodesk licenses than people in the USA do).

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