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View Full Version : Overclocking i7 3930k 3.2 GHz to 4.6 GHz


SoulArcanium
08-12-2012, 02:19 PM
I am going to study 3D animation in Uni starting this September. Should I overclock this CPU? Most people say that it is going to last more than 3 years if I do decide to overclock it but I am not sure if I should do it.

I am going to use Autodesk Maya (mainly), ZBrush, Nuke, After Effects and other 3D OS's. I am also going to use it for a bit of gaming.

I would really like to see what others say.

sentry66
08-12-2012, 07:43 PM
I've had systems overclocked 50% last me 10 years until they were just too slow relative to modern computers to bother with anymore even as a spare file server.

Overclocking isn't all that risky if you know what you're doing. CPU's are supposed to have something like a 25 year shelf life of constant use. Overclocking around 50% probably cuts their lifespan in half or so which is still way longer than anyone would bother using the machine for.

The main things are:
Don't use water cooling for machines that will do heavy unattended CPU crunching in case the pump fails and no one is around to notice.

Try to keep max CPU temps below 80C, preferably below 75C.

Be super careful not to make the Vcore voltage too high, and only creep it up for stability. Don't necessarily go for settings gamers use. Their settings might be fine for 3-8 hour heavy gaming sessions that max out 2-4 cores, but not 24/7 with all cores maxed for rendering.

Not every motherboard is set up for heavy overclocking and might only handle mild overclocking.

SoulArcanium
08-12-2012, 09:54 PM
Be super careful not to make the Vcore voltage too high, and only creep it up for stability. Don't necessarily go for settings gamers use. Their settings might be fine for 3-8 hour heavy gaming sessions that max out 2-4 cores, but not 24/7 with all cores maxed for rendering.


Thanks for the feedback!

I am not going to be doing Overclocking myself because I am a complete noob in that area. A company where I am going to order the PC from is going to do it for me, safely and professionally.

Can you expand a little more on the Vcore voltage? All I know is that I am going to receive an overclocked 3930K i7 and that it is going to be slightly faster and will improve the performance of maya and other 3D applications. (According to research) I also know that I will have to enable Turbo technology in BIOS to make it work to begin with and that's it. I no nothing about overclocking beyond that point. Will I have to constantly tweak the settings or something?

Appreciate your help, good sir!

Here is the full Spec :

Case
InWIN WHITE DRAGON RIDER GAMING CASE

Overclocked CPU
Overclocked Intel® Six Core i7-3930K (3.2GHz @ max 4.6GHz)

Motherboard
ASUS® P9X79: INTEL® SOCKET LG2011

Memory (RAM)
32GB KINGSTON HYPERX GENESIS QUAD-DDR3 1600MHz X.M.P(8 x 4GB KIT)

Graphics Card
1GB NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 560 Ti - 2 DVI, HDMI, VGA - 3D Vision Ready

Memory - 1st Hard Disk
120GB INTEL® 330 SERIES SSD, SATA 6 Gb/s (upto 500MB/sR | 450MB/sW)

2nd Hard Disk
2TB WD CAVIAR BLACK WD2002FAEX, SATA 6 Gb/s, 64MB CACHE (7200rpm)

1st DVD/BLU-RAY Drive
24x DUAL LAYER DVD WRITER ±R/±RW/RAM

Power Supply
CORSAIR 650W ENTHUSIAST SERIES™ TX650 V2-80 PLUS® BRONZE (£69)

Processor Cooling
SPIRE GEMINI REV.3-THERMAX HDT TWIN FAN CPU COOLER (£39)

Thermal Paste
ARCTIC MX-4 EXTREME THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY COMPOUND (£9)

Sound Card
ONBOARD 8 CHANNEL (7.1) HIGH DEF AUDIO (AS STANDARD)

Network Facilities
10/100/1000 GIGABIT LAN PORT - AS STANDARD ON ALL PCs

USB Options
6 x USB 2.0 PORTS @ BACK PANEL (MIN 2 FRONT PORTS) AS STANDARD

cgbeige
08-12-2012, 10:38 PM
I have a 3930k 3.2GHz running at 4.5 GHz without any voltage increase - just some other EFI tweaks of my ASRock Extreme4. I wanted to avoid increasing power consumption and it works great. It locked up with Prime95 at 4.6GHz so I dropped it back to 4.5GHz and it's been perfectly stable since.

Make sure to read a good overclock guide - don't use OC presets if your motherboard offers them.

sentry66
08-12-2012, 11:18 PM
you can get away with more conservative Vcore settings if the machine is only doing cpu rendering only. If it's your main workstation and is doing more I/O and video card functions while also doing heavy cpu loads, the vcore will have to be increased until stability is reached.

you can run prime95 in combination with furmark for tuning stability or use the intel burn test instead of prime 95 which can also max out memory I/O along with running the cpu even harder etc.

I'd avoid going over 1.4 vcore under load with the 3930k if possible. The 1.5+ vcore's that gamers use IMO are total BS for 3D work. Running that high at 5+ghz will surely burn out your hardware pretty quick with 24/7 cpu rendering than running at 4.6 ghz with less than 1.4vcore. Especially if it's at a constant 1.5+ vcore without letting the vcore drop when not under load.

My 4.7ghz 3930k runs at 1.38vcore, but then again I lapped my cpu so temps are lower and don't spike as fast in heavy I/O, video, memory, and cpu tasks.

I'd avoid turbo mode if the system is already manually overclocked up high. Having the cpu speed bump up higher makes it more difficult to tune for stability.

You can use a temperature utility like realtempGT to monitor temps.

If someone is setting it all up for you, chances are it'll be fine as long as they aren't setting it up like an extreme gaming setup. If it's a company doing the work and offering warranty, then you can be sure it's probably pretty conservative in the first place.

SoulArcanium
08-13-2012, 12:54 AM
I have a 3930k 3.2GHz running at 4.5 GHz without any voltage increase - just some other EFI tweaks of my ASRock Extreme4. I wanted to avoid increasing power consumption and it works great. It locked up with Prime95 at 4.6GHz so I dropped it back to 4.5GHz and it's been perfectly stable since.

Make sure to read a good overclock guide - don't use OC presets if your motherboard offers them.

I am ordering this rig from a company. They are going to overclock it there :P

SoulArcanium
08-13-2012, 12:59 AM
If someone is setting it all up for you, chances are it'll be fine as long as they aren't setting it up like an extreme gaming setup. If it's a company doing the work and offering warranty, then you can be sure it's probably pretty conservative in the first place.

Yeah. The company that is going to be doing it does it really well according to the customer feedbacks. So I decided to have it overclocked. Once I get the machine and set everything up, what should I be doing?

I know that I have to get Temperature monitoring utilities but other than that, is there anything else I should do? (CPU wise) If temperatures do start rising what should I do or use to decrease the load? (I do have warranty for a year which includes part replacements but I want to know just in case)

Also, what would I do if I'd like to reduce the voltage to about 1.4 or lower? (if it is at 1.45+)
Thanks for all the info so far!

sentry66
08-13-2012, 07:50 AM
Yeah. The company that is going to be doing it does it really well according to the customer feedbacks. So I decided to have it overclocked. Once I get the machine and set everything up, what should I be doing?

I know that I have to get Temperature monitoring utilities but other than that, is there anything else I should do? (CPU wise) If temperatures do start rising what should I do or use to decrease the load? (I do have warranty for a year which includes part replacements but I want to know just in case)

Also, what would I do if I'd like to reduce the voltage to about 1.4 or lower? (if it is at 1.45+)
Thanks for all the info so far!

I'd just download speedfan or cpuz to to see where your vcore is at. IMO RealtempGT has been better and more consistent for temp monitoring for supporting different motherboards, but sometimes other software works better - or some boards come with their own monitoring software.

you reduce the voltage by going into the BIOS and adjusting it, unless there's a software utility to do it within your OS. You'll only get a good reading of the vcore when the cpu is under load. Otherwise, if the intel power reduction stuff is on (which I personally recommend) the vcore will be really low when the cpu is idle

SoulArcanium
08-13-2012, 09:51 AM
Thank you so much!

I literally knew nothing about overclocked CPU's before you explained some important aspects of it to me. :)

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