PDA

View Full Version : File's super big. How can I minimize?


kelasa
08-08-2012, 06:03 PM
I want to create a massive uber detailed black and white mural. 3x6 ft. I've tried importing all sorts of my line work and it got u to 2 gigs really fast. My computer doesn't care that much but it's no longer as quick with the file.

I really don't want to do this mural by hand. Is there anyway to make an intricate muraled peice as large as this without file size growing too massive? I've thought about dividing the piece into 20 sections and trying to import them onto the same psd-jpg at the end.

Or should I import line work from illustrator? I really want to use hatching for the shading though.

Any ideas to help for this project?

Thank you.

Dillster
08-18-2012, 11:27 PM
Will the mural consist of just text, or images, or a mix? Have you tried converting it as a vector image? That's what all the sign lads do for billboard stuff. I had a summer job last year in a sign shop and just about everything for boards and automobile graphics went from Photoshop into the printers software, converted to vector and then printed.

kelasa
08-20-2012, 02:18 AM
thank you for your reply.

It'll be just images. I want to create black and white line drawings with shading.

Should I make them in illustrator first as vector and import them into PS to shade them?

In my attempt, I have forty+ layers. Maybe adding many layers is also helping slow it down?

The images are super small, so the 6'x3' image will end up really having a lot of linework.

BillyWJ
09-05-2012, 08:37 PM
thank you for your reply.

It'll be just images. I want to create black and white line drawings with shading.

Should I make them in illustrator first as vector and import them into PS to shade them?

In my attempt, I have forty+ layers. Maybe adding many layers is also helping slow it down?

The images are super small, so the 6'x3' image will end up really having a lot of linework.

Okay, I'm a professional designer/illustrator with 20 years experience, so let me put my "pro" hat on. :)

(Edited because I didn't read carefully)(doh)

The key here is, where are you going to get this printed? If you're going to use a commercial large-scale inkjet, like Kinko's and most print shops offer, and you want to submit Photoshop files, you'll need to create the file at 100% of print size (or bigger), at 300dpi. Illustrator is a better choice, as it will create smaller files, and be very clean, and you'll also need to create the file at 100% of print size, at 300 dpi (Illustrator files have an intended output dpi, it's critical).

Now, the good news is, you don't have to submit a layered file - most commercial printers don't want them, unless you have a workflow with them and they're comfortable changing your files. All you need to do is give them an unlayered .psd, or even a jpeg, as long as you have no compression set (that will cause artifacts), and since this is black and white, you can send a greyscale image, which reduces the file size more. Keep your original black and white layered file (I always save it with "work" in the title), and save a copy out as a .psd or .jpg.

Most printers these days prefer PDF as a file, too, which leads to smaller file size as well. As always, call the printer who's going to print the file, and ask what they prefer/need.

PS- you don't want to do the tile thing - most shops don't want to handle it that way, there's too much opportunity for mistakes and issues. An unlayered filed at that size, in greyscale, should only be about 200 megs.

PPS - yes, adding layers will slow you down. You can combine layers once you're done with them, and keep things small, but you need to be sure you won't be back to edit. I have created many, many files that are over 2 gigs, sometimes you just have to take the hit to performance.

CGTalk Moderation
09-05-2012, 08:37 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.