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brianod
08-07-2012, 12:29 PM
I'm building a new system. Amd 6 core processor. I'm going to use an OCZ agility 3 ssd in a dual boot system. I still have old graphics utilities that need xp.

I can still get a legal copy of xp pro with service pack 3 (32 bit) and I want to dual boot with windows 7 64 bit. I'm guessing that xp won't recognize all 6 cores but Windows 7 will.

I guess my question is will xp and windows 7 coexist on the same ssd? I'm concerned about trim support for the drive which Win 7 has but xp does not. Both will be in NTFS format but the OS's will exist in different partitions. I could, if necessary, get another ssd (same type) and put the OS's individually on each drive. Thanks.

imashination
08-07-2012, 02:23 PM
What do you run that needs xp?

olson
08-07-2012, 02:50 PM
If you setup the partitions with Windows 7 they should be aligned. Then install Windows XP after the partitions are setup, then install Windows 7 last. Or consider a virtual machine to run Windows XP which would be the ideal solution in my opinion. As far as I know Windows XP should recognize all of the cores but it will not use all of the memory (will see around 3GB but applications can only use about 2GB of that). Out of curiosity what do you need that requires Windows XP?

brianod
08-07-2012, 03:14 PM
I thought that xp virtual was only on Windows 7 Enterprise (which is only available to large corporations).

To answer your question I have old versions of Corel Paint and some other 32 bit software that I own legally and know how they work because of years of use. I have had terrible results with Windows 7 64 Home trying to run anything in xp compatibility mode (any service pack emulation).

I also have some treasured games like Mech Warrior 3 that won't run on anything much later than xp 32 bit.

Thanks for your help. Partitioning and formatting in win 7 NTFS sounds like the right way to go to start the setup.

olson
08-07-2012, 03:22 PM
I thought that xp virtual was only on Windows 7 Enterprise (which is only available to large corporations).

To me it sounds like all of those should be just fine in a virtual machine. The feature you speak of is Microsoft's own implementation of a Windows XP virtual machine which is just one of dozens of options. There are open source options like VirtualBox (my personal favorite) which allow you to virtualize pretty much any operating system on pretty much any host (Windows, Linux, OS X, Solaris, the list goes on). You still need a Windows XP license as if it were a physical machine.

https://www.virtualbox.org/

There are commercial options from vendors like VMware too. My guess is you'd be happy with VirtualBox but just pointing out there are other options that have commercial support and more features.

http://www.vmware.com/products/workstation/overview.html

If you try one out be sure that hardware virtualization is on in the software and the BIOS which allows the virtual machine to run processes from the guest directly on the processor which provides almost native performance unlike older virtual machines which were a small fraction of native performance.

brianod
08-07-2012, 03:37 PM
I'll give VirtualBox a try (I still need a copy of XP that needs to get registered, correct?). Even in virtual mode?

I haven't chosen my AM3 motherboard but it will be a Gigabyte brand MicroAtx board and that should support virtualization in the bios. It will be one of the upper boards in the line.

Probably this one.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128440

olson
08-07-2012, 03:41 PM
...(I still need a copy of XP that needs to get registered, correct?). Even in virtual mode?

That's correct. Microsoft doesn't care if the machine is a virtual one or physical one, you're still using their software. This is a poor policy in my opinion but that's how they do it. The Windows 7 Enterprise is the exception which includes the Windows XP license.


I haven't chosen my AM3 motherboard but it will be a Gigabyte brand MicroAtx board and that should support virtualization in the bios. It will be one of the upper boards in the line.


The hardware accelerated virtualization is a feature of the processor and most modern processors have it. Intel calls the feature Intel VT and AMD calls it AMD-V.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86_virtualization#Hardware_assist

brianod
08-07-2012, 04:05 PM
I may go this route. I have some learning to do via the web to get up to speed but you have pointed me in the right direction. Thanks.

olson
08-07-2012, 04:34 PM
Be sure to come back if you have any questions. For the best experience install the guest additions which help the guest operating system better integrate with the virtual machine host (like VirtualBox). So you can share directories between the host and guest, change the guest resolution when resizing the window, and lots of other little goodies.

https://www.virtualbox.org/manual/ch04.html

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