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jarisky
09-23-2011, 11:23 PM
I am looking for a Master's program that will develop my CG skills and also qualify me to teach CG at the college level. I'm specifically interested in 3D modeling and texturing, but I assume most good master's program will require general art classes as well as a bit of animation, cinematography/game design, etc., which I am fine with.

Does anyone have recommendations for any schools/programs along these lines? My ideal goal is to work in the industry while also teaching. I have my BS in Media Arts & Animation from The Art Institute of Portland (yes, I know...the Art Institutes, wince), and have done CG professionally on and off for the last few years. I realize that a lot of commercial and technical art schools may not require a Master's of their teachers like universities, but I think it would definitely make me more hire-able.

I definitely prefer a school in a large-ish city. I'm partial to the west coast because I liked the time I spent there, but I'm open to other regions. I did look over the school list sticky thread, but there are few masters programs listed in general, and most of the CG school reviews I've seen have concerned the Bachelor's program. Thanks for whatever suggestions, tips, etc. you all can give.

cjc2638
09-28-2011, 12:17 AM
I just recently graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology with an undergrad in 3D Digital Graphics. There is a graduate version of my program that is quite good for people new to 3D (I knew a lot of graduate students who had an undergrad in regular animation or various different kinds of illustration). It's a pretty new major at the school, so the program is rather small with a handful of overall excellent teachers. The only reason I say that it might not be great for people already experienced with 3D is because all the graduates take the same classes as the undergraduate students taking the equivalent BFA. So, if you're looking to hone some skills in CG, it could be a perfect match. Their version of the program allows you to basically concentrate on either motion graphics or 3D (to my understanding), and mostly any variant between.

But now I'm in a similar situation as you; I can't go back to RIT for a graduate degree because I already took nearly all of the classes (literally). But, as I'm trying to find other master's programs, the best I usually find is computer animation, which in itself is surprisingly rare. At a good art institute, I mean. No offense to your AI. :)

So, I guess what I'm saying is, take a look at RIT. And, to anyone else, please, more suggestions. I'm also quite interested.

jarisky
09-28-2011, 10:50 PM
Thanks for the suggestion. But I don't really understand what makes this a masters program if it uses the same courses as the Bachelor's program. I checked the website and there isn't a course list for the MFA in film and animation or MFA in computer graphics design, and it doesn't list an MFA for 3D digital graphics.

Also just for your benefit, cjc2638...I don't know your background or your reasoning for wanting to enroll in a grad program, but just FYI in general you don't need a grad degree, or a degree at all really, to get a job in CG. You just need a great portfolio. If a 4 year or postgrad degree is the only or the best way for you personally to gain those skills then go for it, but there are a lot of self-teaching tuts available. I specifically want to get a masters only so I can teach at a university

danielec
10-12-2011, 07:19 AM
I would strongly suggest looking into Computer Graphics Design at Rochester Institute of Technology. CGD focuses on interaction design, motion graphics, 3D modeling, game art and design, web and mobile UI design and visualization.

I know RIT (http://computergraphics.rit.edu/) has a BFA and MFA program in Computer Graphics Design. The curriculum's are different and they combine knowledge of design theory, methodology and aesthetics with skills in 2D and 3D computer graphics, interactive techniques and interfaces.

The Computer Graphics Design program and Film and Animation program have some cross over, however CGD is a two year program and F&A is a three year program. CGD has two years of course work in-conjunction with a thesis. F&A has two years of course work followed by a third year production of a film or animation. Both programs are terminal degrees, therefore upon completion you would be able to teach at the college level.

I hope this helps.

Best Regards.

leigh
10-12-2011, 01:14 PM
I specifically want to get a masters only so I can teach at a university

Please please pleeeaaaase get at least five years or more of actual industry experience before you turn to teaching. The single biggest problem with CG education today is that the majority of people teaching it have no actual industry experience, and therefore have no idea how to properly prepare their students for careers in the field.

jpatel
10-12-2011, 02:42 PM
Please please pleeeaaaase get at least five years or more of actual industry experience before you turn to teaching. The single biggest problem with CG education today is that the majority of people teaching it have no actual industry experience, and therefore have no idea how to properly prepare their students for careers in the field.

QFA. People with solid industry experience, MFA and teaching experience are still hard to find and a lot of schools have to fill the positions with people that have MFA's but no industry experience. If you have all three you will be a better teacher and you'll be able to choose where you teach.

jarisky
10-21-2011, 01:18 AM
Thanks for the suggestions everyone.

Leigh, I agree with your sentiment. I think you may have misunderstood my statement. I didn't mean my only goal is to get a master's and teach; I meant that my only reason for getting a masters in CG would be to teach at a university. I have some industry experience but I definitely to build it up more before teaching, and just as important, I want to continue working in the industry while teaching so I can keep up with current standards. As it turns out, several CG artists recommended against getting a masters to qualify for teaching CG, and suggested building my own portfolio and working, and simply seeking non-full-time-university-professor teaching positions when I get to that point. I'm strongly considering it.

jpatel
10-21-2011, 02:07 AM
Thanks for the suggestions everyone.
As it turns out, several CG artists recommended against getting a masters to qualify for teaching CG, and suggested building my own portfolio and working, and simply seeking non-full-time-university-professor teaching positions when I get to that point. I'm strongly considering it.

This can be one way to go, but you will eventually need to get an MFA if you want to teach full time at a rank higher than instructor (which means more money). If you have enough industry experience some colleges/universities will hire you and let you get your MFA while teaching.

meridianSmith
11-19-2011, 10:57 PM
I've been working in the industry as animator for about 6 years. .. but as I age I would probably like to move towards teaching at the collegiate level. Job security and less overtime being one of the reasons. I'm probably going to go back to school to get a BFA in animation (I can transfer existing credits to get my BFA in one year) and then at some point will pursue my MFA. All of which is going to be very expensive especially if I calculate lost wages. . but hopefully worth it.

Anyone teaching degree programs in animation please feel free to share your experience of that as compared to working full time in the industry.

Cheers,
Daniel

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