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DrVonTrap
09-02-2011, 09:27 PM
Hey, I tried to post this a week ago, but for some reason it didn't take :banghead:

I'm working a scene in space, where the only real light source is a Huge Green Sun. Obviously, if the only light source was just green everything would look horrible, so I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice, or point me towards a tutorial that would help.

Thanks in advance

MrJustin
09-02-2011, 10:26 PM
Let me try to understand exactly what you're trying to achieve. You want to have a green sun but you don't want your scene to feel overwhelmingly green, is that correct? Also please clarify which software and renderer you're using.

- J

DrVonTrap
09-03-2011, 06:17 PM
sorry for my lack of clarity
yes, i'm trying to avoid a completely green scene.

if it's any help, the sun wont be in view, it will be behind the camera.

i'm using Blender, with the internal render engine, although i may switch to LuxRender if blender internal produces unsatisfactory results.

thank you for your help

playmesumch00ns
09-04-2011, 11:26 AM
Why does the sun need to be green if you never see it? What I mean is your scene's going to look pretty strange if you never establish that it's being lit by a green sun.

What exactly is in your scene? There's no reason it has to look horrible, but the choices you make depend a lot on what you're lighting.

Can you post an image of your scene (or even better some renders you've already done) so we can get a better idea of what you're trying to do?

DrVonTrap
09-04-2011, 11:50 AM
The sun has to be green, because the scene is based on another artists idea people who recognise the characters will know why the lighting is green.
I can't show you the scene, because i'm still modleing everything, I was asking for advice so I would know what to do by the time I got to the lighting phase.

If it's going to be very hard to light it, I suppose I could scrap the green sun idea and light with a more conventional setup.

I thought it was possible that there was some generic lighting setup I could use, but I can see that's not going to be possible.

thanks anyway :)

playmesumch00ns
09-04-2011, 11:49 PM
The simplest thing to do would be to take a regular lighting setup like you would for any other shot and then just grade the whole thing green in compositing.

MrJustin
09-06-2011, 01:27 AM
Agreed, grading it is your best bet. Magic Bullitt works wonders.

http://www.redgiantsoftware.com/products/all/magic-bullet-suite/

LowJacK
09-13-2011, 07:59 PM
This is not the best reference but is the closest thing I could find to explain my approach.

http://www.featurepics.com/FI/Thumb/20090301/Light-Bulb-1096077.jpg

Your direct light should be white/yellow and your indirect and shadows should be green.

sinistar
09-15-2011, 12:37 AM
Maybe just make it a greenish swirly clouded sky... with a glint of green where it is really bright...I think colors of things would still evolve to stand out as opposed to having a green tint throughout...

CMobley
09-16-2011, 07:44 PM
the sun is actually green in real life. are u trying to get the color of real sunlight???. if so the light rays are filtered so many times i thinks virtually impossible to pull it off.

CHRiTTeR
09-17-2011, 03:42 PM
use a magenta filter

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